Contact us at programs@hurstonwright.org for any questions regarding submissions.

Hurston/Wright 2024 | 8-Week Summer DC Youth Writers Oral History Program

June 17th-August 9th

About Us

The Hurston/Wright Foundation’s mission is to honor, discover and mentor Black writers. We do that by providing services, supports, and opportunities that provide community and recognize accomplishments. Our community resources include in-person workshops and classes that have been our signature offering for almost 30 years. Workshops and courses are taught by award-winning authors and serve emerging and midcareer adult writers. More than a thousand Black writers have taken our classes since the first one in 1996, increasing diversity in the cultural community as they have gone on to create books and careers as professors, local cultural workers, and national thought leaders. 

Through a social justice lens, our work provides the necessary services, supports and opportunities for Black writers seeking to publish work within a publishing industry that has traditionally failed to publish work by Black writers proportionate to their population. We also recognize that our social activism aids in disrupting systems that hinder Black writers from having access to certain opportunities—from writing residencies to participation in quality writing workshops and craft talks.

 

Mission of Program: The mission of the DC Youth Writers Oral History Program is to equip high school students with the skills to conduct research and capture the narratives of Black writers living and working in Washington, DC. 

Purpose of Program: The purpose of the program is to cultivate youth writing and research skills while honoring Black DC writers living and working in Washington DC.

 

Program Description

The Hurston/Wright Foundation's 2023 DC Youth Writer Oral History Program provides high school students with the opportunity to research and document the impact of Washington, D.C.'s political, social, and economic culture on the Black literary arts community-- and vice versa. By conducting interviews with Black writers in the area, participants will gain a deeper understanding of the community's history and the significant role that Black literary arts have played in shaping it. Through the creation of written and multimedia projects, participants will develop critical thinking, research, and communication skills, which are essential to engaging with diverse perspectives and fostering cross-cultural understanding. By sharing unique and universal stories, the program contributes to a broader understanding of the city's cultural diversity and history and helps to build a more inclusive and equitable society.

Participants will receive hands-on virtual instruction on capturing compelling historical narratives and presenting them publicly through written and digital platforms. Participants will research the impact of Washington, D.C.’s culture, community, and transient population on DC’s Black literary arts community in conjunction with in-person and virtual field trips. Youth participants will interview 5-10 Black writers based in the Washington DC metropolitan area to create written and multi-media projects documenting their findings. Participants will learn: 

  • how to develop interview techniques and meaningful queries to pose to interviewees. 
  • how to evoke relevance and highlight the importance of writers through the use of writing and media technology.
  • how to optimize storytelling strategies by creating a multimedia presentation of their findings. 

DC Writers Interviewed in 2023

  • Brian Gilmore
  • Dinahsta "Miss Kiane" Thomas
  • Melanie Henderson
  • Taylor Johnson
  • Chantal James
  • Darlene Taylor
  • Dwayne "Crochet King" Lawson-Brown
  • Derrick Weston Brown
  • Laini Mataka
  • Briana Thomas

See interviews here: https://youtu.be/hUeGOq-TMWo?si=tOofCUgCA6kInY24

Tangibles

Upon successfully completing the program, participants will be awarded 20 community service hours. Moreover, two outstanding projects, aligning with Hurston/Wright's criteria and produced by participants attending college in either Fall 2024 or Fall 2025, will be eligible for a small scholarship. The specific criteria will be shared at the start of the program. Participants will be recognized at the Legacy Book Awards ceremony.

Who Should Apply

This program is for youth ages 15-18 years-old who live in the Washington DC metropolitan area (which includes Maryland and Virginia). Participants must be current high school students enrolled in public, private, charter or homeschool. Applicants should have an interest in writing and using technology.

Meeting Times

Participants will meet on in-person Monday-Friday from 1 pm-3 pm from June 17th to July 12th. On July 15, students transition to meeting on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 1 pm-3 pm.  Fields trips are incorporated into this program's schedule.  

Application Requirements

  • Write a 3 to 5-paragraph essay describing why you are interested in participating in the DC Youth Writers Oral History Program.
  • Format your document using Times New Roman, 12-point type, double-spaced with 1-inch margins.

Deadline and Fees: 

  • Deadline to Apply:  May 3rd 
  • No application fee.
  • Tuition: $200 (Some partial scholarships are available)
  • Apply early. Hurston/Wright uses rolling admissions for a maximum of 15 slots open.
  • A nonrefundable deposit of $75 is due within 1 week of notification of acceptance into the workshop. The remaining balance is due by June 7th.

Cancellation Policy: If you must cancel after paying the full tuition, $100 will be returned to you if you notify the foundation at least 1 week before the program starts. After that date, the full tuition is forfeited. In addition, Hurston/Wright reserves the right to close the submission period or cancel a session based on the number of applications. Applicants will be notified immediately if the course is canceled, and any payments will be returned.

A detailed schedule will be provided upon acceptance.

 

$250.00

Hurston/Wright 2024 Individual Coaching Sessions

January 2024-May 2024

Visit Our Website

The Hurston/Wright Foundation’s mission is to honor, discover and mentor Black writers. We do that by providing services, supports and opportunities that provide community and recognize accomplishments. Our community resources include in-person workshops and classes that have been our signature offering for almost 30 years. Workshops and courses are taught by award-winning authors and serve emerging and midcareer adult writers. More than a thousand Black writers have taken our classes since the first one in 1996, increasing diversity in the cultural community as they have gone on to create books and careers as professors, local cultural workers, and national thought leaders. We look forward to receiving your application. 

For inquiries regarding the application, email us at programs@hurstonwright.org. 

About the coach

B. Sharise Moore is an award-winning author, curriculum developer, workshop facilitator, Poetry Editor for FIYAH Magazine of Black Speculative Fiction, and the 2023 Writer in Residence for The Hurston Wright Foundation. In 2021, she released her YA magical realism novel, Dr. Marvellus Djinn’s Odd Scholars and in 2022, she curated and edited Conjuring Worlds: An Afrofuturist Textbook for Middle and High School Students. 

Moore’s forthcoming books include Fangs, Feathers, and Folklore, a middle grade field guide of African mythological creatures from Hachette Book Group/Algonquin Young Readers (2025), Fatimah’s Fantastic City, and Golden: a Story of Yaa Asantewaa from HarperCollins (2025, 2026). She lives in Baltimore, MD with her husband and their two children. B. Sharise is represented by Laurie McLean, partner agent at Fuse Literary. 

Coaching description:

A significant portion of the writing process involves shaping a manuscript into a polished piece worthy of presenting to the literary market. As with any product that requires refinement, expert feedback is used as a tool to hone, mold, and produce a quality product. Similarly, coaching sessions with B. Sharise Moore will provide you with an expert review of your children’s, YA, or adult fiction manuscripts in the following stages of your process:

  • Editing, development, and revision 
  • Composing a query letter
  • Outlining publishing expectations
  • Finding an agent
  • Deciding to self-publish vs. traditionally publish your manuscript

Process

To schedule coaching, participants must have a completed manuscript or 750 words for a children’s book. 

  • Submit 750 words of your manuscript to submittable. 
  • B. Sharise will review the first 20 pages of your manuscript. 
  • An email with a link to schedule will be emailed to you, as well as a needs assessment. The assessment will be used to design a session that is tailored to your writerly needs. 
  • The scheduled time will be at the convenience of writer and coach.

Cost 

$250 per hour

Submission Format:

  • 20 pages maximum, using Times New Roman, 12-point type, double-spaced with 1-inch margins.
  • Provide a title page with the author’s name and contact information.
  • Include a cover letter with information about your writing life and citations of any published work.

Cancellation Policy: Please note that is service is non-refundable. If you must cancel after paying the coaching fee and scheduling, you must provide 48-hour notice to reschedule.  In addition, Hurston/Wright reserves the right to cancel a session based on submission details and policies. Submitters will be notified immediately to reschedule.

 

$20.00

Submission Guidelines and Procedures of Awards Competition The Zora Neale Hurston/Richard Wright Foundation is proud to host the annual Hurston/Wright Awards for College Writers, which is the only award of its kind that recognizes Black college writers. The award is the foundation’s first program. It was initiated to support emerging Black artists in fiction and poetry enrolled full-time in an undergraduate or graduate school program anywhere in the United States. The deadline for submission is April 2, 2024

Submissions are judged by distinguished published authors in fiction and poetry who are not employees of the Hurston/Wright Foundation. Selected winners will be notified in July 2024. Only winners will be notified.

There is a $1000 prize for the winner in each category. Also, award winners will be invited to attend a summer workshop of their choice for free, as well as attend the Legacy Award ceremony that is hosted in October in Washington, DC. 

Requirements 

  • Black writers who are full-time students in undergraduate and graduate programs at a college or university      in the United States are eligible to submit a work of fiction or poetry.  They must be enrolled at the time of submission. 
  • Writers who have published books, including poetry chapbooks or fiction narratives, through any publishing platform, are not eligible. Note: Writers are still eligible if they have published pieces that are not books. 
  • All work submitted must be original and unpublished at the time of submission. Hurston/Wright does not accept simultaneous submissions.
  • Author name and contact information should not appear on the submission. 
  • Winning works may be published in whole or in part by Hurston/Wright online or print. Your submission gives      the Hurston/Wright Foundation permission to publish an excerpt or the entire work. The author retains all rights.
  • Hurston/Wright maintains the right to decline any submission not deemed eligible.

Format Guidelines The original creative work submitted should be formatted as follows: 

Fiction:

  • No more than 20 pages of fiction, double-spaced, Times New Roman, 12-point font, and within 1-inch margins.
  • Put title of the work on each page of the submission.
  • Do not put the author’s name on the pages of the work. Provide a separate page with the title of the work, name and contact information of author, school and year of study. 

Poetry:

  • Maximum of 3 poems. 
  • The submission must total at least 120 lines or more.
  • Do not include the author’s name on the pages of poetry. Provide a separate page with the title of the work, name and contact information of author, school and year  of study. 

Questions may be sent to info@hurstonwright.org 

No phone calls or mailed inquiries.

Crossover Award

The Hurston/Wright Crossover Award, sponsored by ESPN’s Andscape, honors probing, provocative, and original new voices in literary nonfiction. Named after the most common dribbling move in basketball, the Crossover Award, aims to highlight an unconventional winner who writes across genres and can effectively crossover between writing styles and techniques. The name also speaks to the potential of the award winner to transition from obscurity to the spotlight. This award will celebrate one writer who contributes a unique perspective to the literary nonfiction landscape. 

The award submission period closes April 2, 2024. The winner of the award, which includes a cash prize, will be announced during the 23rd Annual Legacy Awards Ceremony in October 2024. 

ELIGIBILITY: 

  • Unpublished, Black writers who are 18 years and older are eligible.
  • Writers who have published books, including poetry books or fiction narratives, through any publishing platform, are not eligible
  • Writers who currently work for the Hurston/Wright Foundation or are related to current employees or board members of the Hurston/Wright Foundation are ineligible.
  • All work submitted must be original and unpublished at the time of submission. Hurston/Wright does not accept simultaneous submissions. 
  • Submissions must be works of literary nonfiction. 
  • Essays should explore and illuminate the various intersections of culture and society through innovative storytelling, original reporting and/or provocative commentary. 
  • Submissions may be stand-alone essays or excerpts from a book in progress. 

APPLICATION GUIDELINES: 

  • No more than 20 pages double-spaced, Times New Roman, 12-point font, and within 1-inch margins. 
  • Put title of the work on each page of the submission. 
  • Do not put the author’s name on the pages of the work. All submissions will be screened and judged anonymously. 
  • Author name and contact information should not appear on the submission. All submissions will be judged anonymously by a distinguished published author of literary nonfiction. 
  • Winning works may be published in whole or in part by Hurston/Wright online or in print. Your submission gives the Hurston/Wright Foundation and our sponsor, ESPN, permission to publish an excerpt or the entire work. The author retains all rights. 
  • Hurston/Wright maintains the right to decline any submission not deemed eligible. 


AWARD 

  • $2000 to one recipient 
  • Tuition-free attendance of a 2024 Hurston/Wright summer writer’s workshop 
  • Complimentary ticket to the annual Legacy Awards Ceremony in October 2024

 

Questions may be sent to info@hurstonwright.org

 

$35.00

2024 Virtual Writers Weekend  
June 14th - June 16th  
Visit Our Website
Instructors:
 

  • Fiction Instructor: JJ Amaworo Wilson
  • Non-Fiction Instructor: Jessica Kehinde Ngo
  • Poetry Instructor: Taylor Johnson
  • Research Methods for Writers: Lucy Anne Hurston

About Us
The Hurston/Wright Foundation’s mission is to honor, discover and mentor Black writers. We do that by providing services, supports and opportunities that provide community and recognize accomplishments. Our community resources include in-person workshops and classes that have been our signature offering for almost 30 years. Workshops and courses are taught by award-winning authors and serve emerging and midcareer adult writers. More than a thousand Black writers have taken our classes since the first one in 1996, increasing diversity in the cultural community as they have gone on to create books and careers as professors, local cultural workers, and national thought leaders. 

 
ABOUT OUR WORKSHOPS AND INSTRUCTORS

 Workshop Highlights 

  • 10+ Hours of writing seminars and discussions  
  • One-on-one time with an award-winning writer in your genre  
  • Constructive, guided feedback on your writing from your peers and workshop leader
     

Fiction Workshop Description: 

This workshop empowers students to explore the elements that constitute great fiction and to integrate these insights into their own writing. Regardless of whether their focus lies in crafting short stories, epic fantasies, historical narratives, or murder mysteries, participants will complete this workshop equipped with the essential tools for honing their craft. Students will

  • Acquire proficiency in fundamental aspects such as plot construction, dialogue refinement, and character development.
  • Enhance their mastery of sentence-level composition, leveraging techniques such as imagery, precise vocabulary selection, and rhythmic cadence.
  • Cultivate the disciplined practices characteristic of seasoned fiction writers, encompassing the realms of editing, revising, and manuscript submission.

Designed for aspiring writers at the outset of their journey or those in the process of establishing themselves, this course caters to individuals who are deeply committed to advancing their skills in the craft of writing.

Fiction Instructor:

JJ Amaworo Wilson is the author or co-author of twenty books. His 2016 novel, Damnificados, won four awards including the Hurston/Wright Award for Debut Fiction and was an Oprah Top Pick. His 2021 novel, Nazaré, won three awards. His short fiction has been published in The Penguin Book of New Black Writing, African American Review, Justice Journal, and A Public Space, among many others. Two of Amaworo Wilson’s non-fiction books won prizes that saw him honored at Buckingham Palace in 2008 and 2011. He is the Writer-in-Residence at Western New Mexico University and teaches creative writing at Stonecoast.

Non-Fiction Workshop Description: 

Writing as Reverence & Returning

This course is for writers at all levels. Jessica Kehinde Ngo delves into the concept of writing as a journey back to one's origins. Students will be encouraged to engage in writing exercises that examine various facets of their heritage, such as culinary history, family customs, and community connections.

Students will

  • Gain skills in effectively navigating the portrayal of family members and ancestral narratives.
  • Explore the nuanced concept of truth as it relates to writing from personal recollection.
  • Discover techniques for seamlessly blending personal experiences with broader universal themes.

Nonfiction Instructor

Jessica Kehinde Ngo is a Nigerian-American food writer and memoirist. Her writing has appeared or is forthcoming in publications, such as Epicurious, Whetstone, TASTE, the James Beard Foundation blog, The Counter, The New York Times, Eaten, and Cuisine Noir. She was a 2022 - 2023 Legacy Network Advisee for the James Beard Foundation and a 2023 winner of an IACP Food Writing Award. She is Associate Professor of English at Otis College of Art and Design in Los Angeles and is currently writing a book about the role plantain has played in her life.

Poetry Workshop Description: 

Holding The Grain

This workshop will explore the language of sound supplementing the language of sense. We will study poems that inhabit and orbit a sense of linguistic ineffability, as well as generate poems within that mode of address and expression.

The title of this course is taken from Roland Barthes’ essay “The Grain of the Voice." Barthes’ ‘grain’ refers to “the body in the voice as it sings, the hand as it writes, the limb as it performs.” We will navigate our understanding of language as material and the ecosystem of the poem as an animate field of knowing, change, and contradiction.  We will read some poems together and write as well, but most importantly, we’ll get a sense of the music and dissonance present in the material of our poems. Accepted students will be sent Roland Barthes’ essay “The Grain of the Voice” to read before the start of the workshop. 

It is my hope that there will be moments of genuine connection, a greater sense of the potentials of poetic language, and an exploration of language as material.

Poetry Instructor

Taylor Johnson is from Washington, DC. He is the author of Inheritance (Alice James Books, 2020), winner of the 2021 Norma Farber First Book Award from the Poetry Society of America.  His work appears in Poetry Magazine, The Paris Review, The Baffler, Scalawag, and elsewhere.  Johnson is a Cave Canem graduate fellow and a recipient of the 2017 Larry Neal Writers’ Award  from the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities, and the 2021 Judith A. Markowitz Award  for Emerging Writers from Lambda Literary. Taylor was the inaugural 2022 Poet-in-Residence at  the Guggenheim Museum. He is the Poet Laureate of Takoma Park, Maryland. With his wife, Elizabeth Bryant, Taylor curates the Green Way Reading Series at People’s Book in Takoma Park. 

Research Methods for Writers Workshop Description: 

Utilizing her extensive background in Sociology spanning decades, Lucy Anne Hurston will guide participants through a three-day course emphasizing:

  • In-depth exploration of a chosen topic through the sociological perspective.
  • Techniques for effectively organizing large volumes of information.
  • Ethical considerations in both written expression and presentation.

Prior familiarity with research methods is not a prerequisite. The course will offer a gentle introduction, culminating in a modest project for each participant to showcase to their peers.

Research Methods for Writers Instructor:

Lucy Anne Hurston, niece of prominent 20th-century writer Zora Neale Hurston and Professor Emerita (Sociology), is the author of the remarkable multimedia biography Speak, So You Can Speak Again: A Life of Zora Neale Hurston (2004).  Drawing from her experience of working on this project and teaching research methods to aspiring scholars, 

Submission Format:

Please ensure that your submission aligns with the genre to which you are applying.

For fiction, nonfiction
       10 page maximum, using Times New Roman, 12-point type, double-spaced with 1-inch margins.

 For poetry applicants:
       Submit no more than 3 poems for consideration, no less than 2.


All applicants
       Provide a title page with the author’s name and contact information.

  • Include a cover letter with information about your writing life and citations of any published work.
  • Applicants may apply to one workshop only.  Previous attendees are eligible to apply.

DISCLAIMER: Applicants must not contact instructors directly about the application process or send queries regarding other projects, unless invited by the instructor directly. If these actions occur, applicants will be ineligible to attend our writing workshops. 

Deadline and Fees:
 

  • Deadline: May 3rd
  • Application fee: $35
  • Tuition: $450
  • Apply early. Hurston/Wright uses rolling admissions for a maximum of 10 slots per class. All applicants will be notified by or before May 17th.
  • A nonrefundable deposit of $150 is due within 1 week of notification of acceptance into the workshop. The remaining balance is due by June 7th.
  • Cancellation Policy: If you must cancel after paying the full tuition, $100 will be returned to you if you notify the foundation at least 1 week before the program starts. After that date, the full tuition is forfeited. In addition, Hurston/Wright reserves the right to close the submission period or cancel a session based on the number of applications. Applicants will be notified immediately if the course is canceled, and any payments will be returned.
  • Workshops start at 9 am-3pm EST. A detailed schedule will be provided upon acceptance.

 

$35.00

2024 Writers Week  
July 8th -July 12th
Visit Our Website

Instructors:
 

  • Poetry Instructor:  simóne j banks
  • Fiction Instructor: Alaya Johnson
  • Non-fiction Instructor: Zelda Lockhart
     

About Us
The Hurston/Wright Foundation’s mission is to honor, discover and mentor Black writers. We do that by providing services, supports and opportunities that provide community and recognize accomplishments. Our community resources include in-person workshops and classes that have been our signature offering for almost 30 years. Workshops and courses are taught by award-winning authors and serve emerging and midcareer adult writers. More than a thousand Black writers have taken our classes since the first one in 1996, increasing diversity in the cultural community as they have gone on to create books and careers as professors, local cultural workers, and national thought leaders. 

 ABOUT OUR WORKSHOPS AND INSTRUCTORS

 Workshop Highlights 

  • 10+ Hours of writing seminars and discussions  
  • One-on-one time with an award-winning writer in your genre  
  • Constructive, guided feedback on your writing from your peers and workshop leader

Poetry Workshop Description:
The Body is the Land

What does it mean to restage, reimagine and restore the earth as Black? In the spirit of Lucille Clifton, we write so that memory can be as whole as possible. In this 5-day meditative class, professional and emerging writers are welcomed to listen and write towards the conflation of the past and present. The goal for the class is to individually seek to restage, reimagine, and restore our collective and individual memories of the lands we occupy, as sites of memory. What stories will we remember? What traditions were there? What voice(s) do we hear? We will look at poetic form, structure and found materials such as elements of nature and documents to explore the stories we want to tell. Students can expect light homework and exercises for reflection and capture of these memories along with a class share at the end of the week.

Poetry Instructor
simóne j banks, an Assistant Professor of English at Albright College, is a writer with a deep interest in exploring the spatial, aural, and optical perceptual planes of ancestral and present-day Black ecologies. Her work has been featured in esteemed publications such as the Santa Fe Writers Project, About Place Journal, and eMerge Journal. She is currently working on her debut poetry collection, continuum. She holds an MFA in creative writing from Louisiana State University, where she earned the William Jay Smith Thesis Award in poetry.

Fiction Workshop Description:

As Zora Neale Hurston has told us, "There is no agony like bearing an untold story inside you." Explore craft, art, and imagination in a supportive workshop environment geared to help fiction writers craft their inner stories. 

This will be a collaborative workshop in which emerging writers with fundamental knowledge of crafting and completing fiction will learn from one another as well as from the instructor. 

Our main goals will be to:

  • Learn to give and receive constructive feedback, spotting common issues in our own and others' work.
  • Dissect  and discuss craft techniques such as POV, describing characters, dialogue, and building emotion.
  • Recognize what makes your voice unique, and honor that spark as you revise your work.

Fiction Instructor 

Alaya Dawn Johnson is an award-winning short story writer and the author of eight novels for adults and young adults. N.K. Jemisin has hailed her recent YA science fiction novel, The Library of Broken Worlds, as "modern epic poetry." Her most recent novel for adults, Trouble the Saints, won the 2021 World Fantasy Award for best novel. Her debut short story collection, Reconstruction, was an Ignyte Award and a Hurston/Wright Legacy Award finalist. Her debut YA novel The Summer Prince was longlisted for the National Book Award for Young People's Literature, and the follow-up Love Is the Drug was awarded the Andre Norton Nebula Award. Her short stories have appeared in many magazines and anthologies, most notably the title story in The Memory Librarian, in collaboration with Janelle Monáe. She lives in Oaxaca, Mexico. 

Nonfiction Workshop Description:

Throughout history, our ancestors and elders often shielded us from pain by highlighting the positive aspects of our heritage while omitting the darker realities, such as the intergenerational traumas stemming from colonization. However, acknowledging these painful truths is essential for our collective healing journey. In this memoir workshop, we will utilize our lingering questions as writing prompts, alongside additional prompts and research guidance provided by Dr. Lockhart, to serve as the foundation for crafting a multigenerational memoir.

Outcomes:

  • Equipping you with the necessary tools to establish a consistent daily writing practice for effectively documenting your memoir.
  • Providing spiritual and emotional support to help you authentically depict the pivotal moments of self-healing and ancestral healing within your narrative.
  • Offering guidance on conducting thorough research into your personal history and the history of your community.

Submission Format:
 Please ensure that your submission aligns with the genre to which you are applying.

For fiction, nonfiction  

  • 10 page maximum, using Times New Roman, 12-point type, double-spaced with 1-inch margins.

 For poetry applicants: 

  • Submit no more than 3 poems for consideration, no less than 2.

All applicants

  • Provide a title page with the author’s name and contact information.
  • Include a cover letter with information about your writing life and citations of any published work.
  • Applicants may apply to one workshop only.  Previous attendees are eligible to apply.

DISCLAIMER: Applicants must not contact instructors directly about the application process or send queries regarding other projects, unless invited by the instructor directly. If these actions occur, applicants will be ineligible to attend our writing workshops. 


Deadline and Fees:
 

  • Deadline: May 3rd
  • Application fee: $35
  • Tuition: $450
  • Apply early. Hurston/Wright uses rolling admissions for a maximum of 10 slots per workshop. All applicants will be notified by or before May 17th.
  • A nonrefundable deposit of $150 is due within 1 week of notification of acceptance into the workshop. The remaining balance is due by June 7th. 
  • Cancellation Policy: If you must cancel after paying the full tuition, $100 will be returned to you if you notify the foundation at least 1 week before the program starts. After that date, the full tuition is forfeited. In addition, Hurston/Wright reserves the right to close the submission period or cancel a session based on the number of applications. Applicants will be notified immediately, and any payments will be returned if the class is canceled.
     
  • Workshops start at 6 pm-8 pm EST. A detailed schedule will be provided upon acceptance. 


Hurston/Wright Foundation